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Tech Updates

Teeny-Tiny Bluetooth Transmitter Runs on Less Than 1 Milliwatt
Date
March 2019
Source

Engineers at the University of Michigan have now built the first millimeter-scale stand-alone device that speaks BLE. Consuming just 0.6 milliwatts during transmission, it would broadcast for 11 years using a typical 5.8-millimeter coin battery. Such a millimeter-scale BLE radio would allow these ant-size sensors to communicate with ordinary equipment, even a smartphone. In the new circuit, the team used the antenna itself as the inductor in the resonant tank. Because it was acting as an inductor, the antenna radiated using a changing magnetic field instead of an electric field; that meant it could be more compact.

 

Lumotive Says It’s Got a Solid-State Lidar That Really Works
Date
March 2019
Source

Lumotive, a startup in Bellevue, Wash., has a compact, long-range lidar sensor that is at least as capable as the best machines from its rivals but smaller, cheaper to make, and more robust. The device can thus see far without having to turn up the brightness. That’s important because the sensor works at 905 nanometers, an eye-sensitive wavelength the company chose because it works with silicon. Lumotive shines a beam on a liquid-crystal “metamaterial” that has tiny tunable components, each of which can be used to slow down one part of the laser beam with respect to another part. 

Date
February 2019
Source

In Concrete application there are highly individual, the number of pieces is small, and manufacturing costs are very high. This is the point of departure of the new DiFeMiS Research Laboratory at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT). It is to develop print technologies for individual, small, and inexpensive high-frequency systems up to the terahertz range (THz).

Samsung Claims First 512GB Embedded UFS
Date
February 2019
Source

Samsung Electronics said it has begun mass production of the first 512GB embedded Universal Flash Storage (eUFS) device. The 512GB eUFS 3.0 device stacks eight of its fifth-generation 512Gb V-NAND die and integrates a high-performance controller. At 2,100MB/s, the new eUFS doubles the sequential read rate of Samsung’s latest eUFS 2.1 memory.

Researchers Develop a New Way to Control and Standardize the Production of Nanowires on Silicon Surfaces
Date
February 2019
Source

Nanowires measure just 5–100 nm in diameter and have the ability to transform the technology around people. In the regular process used for developing nanowires, extremely small holes are made in silicon monoxide and these are subsequently filled with a nanodrop of liquid gallium. When this substance comes into contact with arsenic, it solidifies. However, this process causes the substance to become hard at the nanoholes’ corners, which implies that it is not possible to predict the angle at which the nanowires will grow. Researchers were looking for a method to develop uniform nanowires and regulate their position.