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Tech Updates

Date
April 2019
Source

The Microelectronics Packaging & Test Engineering Council (MEPTEC) held its monthly meeting at SEMI in Milpitas on April 10.  Two speakers outlined their companies’ capabilities and demonstrated their own expertise in solving specific industry challenges. Tom Gregorich presented why and how Zeiss supports IC package inspection with 3D X-ray machines, then Sitaram Arkalgud conveyed the benefits of Xperi’s direct bond interconnect (DBI™) technology for interposer (2.5D) designs and vertical die stacking (3D).

Intel's View of the Chiplet Revolution
Date
April 2019
Source

Chiplets are a way to make systems that perform a lot like they are all one chip, despite actually being composed of several smaller chips. They’re widely seen as one part of the computing industry’s plan to keep systems performing better and better despite the fact that traditional Moore’s Law scaling is nearing its end. Ramune Nagisetty, a principal engineer and director of process and product integration at Intel’s technology development group in Oregon, has been working to help develop an industry-wide chiplet ecosystem.

Teeny-Tiny Bluetooth Transmitter Runs on Less Than 1 Milliwatt
Date
March 2019
Source

Engineers at the University of Michigan have now built the first millimeter-scale stand-alone device that speaks BLE. Consuming just 0.6 milliwatts during transmission, it would broadcast for 11 years using a typical 5.8-millimeter coin battery. Such a millimeter-scale BLE radio would allow these ant-size sensors to communicate with ordinary equipment, even a smartphone. In the new circuit, the team used the antenna itself as the inductor in the resonant tank. Because it was acting as an inductor, the antenna radiated using a changing magnetic field instead of an electric field; that meant it could be more compact.

 

Lumotive Says It’s Got a Solid-State Lidar That Really Works
Date
March 2019
Source

Lumotive, a startup in Bellevue, Wash., has a compact, long-range lidar sensor that is at least as capable as the best machines from its rivals but smaller, cheaper to make, and more robust. The device can thus see far without having to turn up the brightness. That’s important because the sensor works at 905 nanometers, an eye-sensitive wavelength the company chose because it works with silicon. Lumotive shines a beam on a liquid-crystal “metamaterial” that has tiny tunable components, each of which can be used to slow down one part of the laser beam with respect to another part. 

Date
February 2019
Source

In Concrete application there are highly individual, the number of pieces is small, and manufacturing costs are very high. This is the point of departure of the new DiFeMiS Research Laboratory at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT). It is to develop print technologies for individual, small, and inexpensive high-frequency systems up to the terahertz range (THz).